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Publications » Computers » Networking

Network Analysis Architecture Design

Price £44.99

temporarily out of stock

Network Analysis Architecture Design

James McCabe

ISBN 1558608877
Pages 450

Description
The landscape of networking has changed so that network services have now become one of the most important factors to the success of many third generation networks. It has become an important feature of the designer's job to define the problems that exist in his network, choose and analyze several optimization parameters during the analysis process, and then prioritize and evaluate these parameters in the architecture and design of the system.

Network Analysis, Architecture, and Design, 2e, uses a systems methodology approach to teaching these concepts, which views the network (and the environment it impacts) as part of the larger system, looking at interactions and dependencies between the network and its users, applications, and devices. This approach matches the new business climate where customers drive the development of new services and the book discusses how networks can be architected and designed to provide many different types of services to customers.

This second edition contains an entirely new focus on network architecture, which completes the process from analysis to design. Network architecture takes the input from network analysis and provides a high-level view of the network, focusing on the relationships between major functions of the network, such as security, network management, performance and addressing and routing. A reference architecture, outlining how these functions are to be addressed within the network, serves as the foundation for the network design.

With a number of examples, analogies, instructor tips, and exercises, this book works through the processes of analysis, architecture, and design step by step, giving network designers a solid resource for making good design decisions

Contents
Chapter One-- Introduction 1.1 Objectives 1.1.1 Preparation 1.2 Background 1.3 Overview of Analysis, Architecture and Design Processes 1.3.1 Hierarchy and Interconnectivity 1.3.2 Importance of Network Analysis 1.3.3 Model for Network Analysis, Architecture and Design 1.4 A Systems Methodology 1.5 System Description 1.6 Service Description 1.7 Service Characteristics 1.7.1 Service Levels 1.7.2 System Components and Network Services 1.7.3 Service Requests and Requirements 1.7.4 Service Offerings 1.7.5 Service Metrics 1.8 Performance Characteristics 1.8.1 Capacity 1.8.2 Delay 1.8.3 RMA 1.8.4 Performance Envelopes 1.9 Network Supportability 1.10 Conclusions 1.11 Exercises Chapter Two—Requirements Analysis: Concepts 2.1 Objectives 2.2 Background 2.2.1 Requirements and Features 2.2.2 The Need for Requirements Analysis 2.3 User Requirements 2.4 Application Requirements 2.4.1 Application Types 2.4.2 Application Groups 2.4.3 Application Locations 2.5 Device Requirements 2.5.1 Device Types 2.5.2 Performance Characteristics 2.5.3 Device Locations 2.6 Network Requirements 2.6.1 Existing Networks and Migration 2.6.2 Network Management and Security 2.7 Other Requirements 2.7.1 Supplemental Performance Requirements 2.7.2 Financial Requirements 2.7.3 Enterprise Requirements 2.8 The Requirements Specification and Map 2.9 Conclusions 2.10 Exercises Chapter Three—Requirements Analysis: Process 3.1 Objectives 3.1.1 Preparation 3.2 Gathering and Listing Requirements 3.2.1 Determining Initial Conditions 3.2.2 Setting Customer Expectations 3.2.3 Working with Users 3.2.4 Taking Performance Measurements 3.2.5 Tracking and Managing Requirements 3.2.6 Mapping Location Information 3.3 Developing Service Metrics 3.3.1 Measurement Tools 3.3.2 Where to Apply Service Metrics 3.4 Characterizing Behavior 3.4.1 Modeling and Simulation 3.4.2 User Behavior 3.4.3 Application Behavior 3.5 Developing RMA Requirements 3.5.1 Reliability 3.5.2 Maintainability 3.5.3 Availability 3.5.4 Thresholds and Limits 3.6 Developing Delay Requirements 3.6.1 End-to-End and Round-Trip Delays 3.6.2 Delay Variation 3.7 Developing Capacity Requirements 3.7.1 Estimating Data Rates 3.8 Developing Supplemental Performance Requirements 3.8.1 Operational Suitability 3.8.2 Supportability 3.8.3 Confidence 3.9 Environment-Specific Thresholds and Limits 3.9.1 Comparing Application Requirements 3.10 Requirements for Predictable and Guaranteed Performance 3.10.1 Requirements for Predictable Performance 3.10.2 Requirements for Guaranteed Performance 3.11 Requirements Mapping 3.12 Developing the Requirements Specification 3.13 Conclusions 3.14 Exercises Chapter Four—Flow Analysis 4.1 Objectives 4.1.1 Preparation 4.2 Background 4.3 Flows 4.3.1 Individual and Composite Flows 4.3.2 Critical Flows 4.4 Identifying and Developing Flows 4.4.1 Focusing on a Particular Application 4.4.2 Developing a Profile 4.4.3 Choosing the Top N Applications 4.5 Data Sources and Sinks 4.6 Flow Models 4.6.1 Peer-to-Peer 4.6.2 Client-Server 4.6.3 Hierarchical Client-Server 4.6.4 Distributed-Computing 4.7 Flow Prioritization 4.8 The Flow Specification 4.8.1 Flowspec Algorithm 4.8.2 Capacity and Service Planning 4.9 Example Application of Flow Analysis 4.10 Conclusions 4.11 Exercises Chapter Five—Network Architecture 5.1 Objectives 5.1.1 Preparation 5.2 Background 2.2.1 Architecture and Design 5.3 Component Architectures 5.3.1 Addressing/Routing Component Architecture 5.3.2 Network Management Component Architecture 5.3.3 Performance Component Architecture 5.3.4 Security Component Architecture 5.3.5 Optimizing Component Architectures 5.4 Reference Architecture 5.4.1 External Relationships 5.4.2 Optimizing the Reference Architecture 5.5 Architectural Models 5.5.1 Topological Models 5.5.2 Flow-Based Models 5.5.3 Functional Models 5.5.4 Using the Architectural Models 5.6 Systems and Network Architectures 5.7 Conclusions 5.8 Exercises Chapter Six—Addressing and Routing Architecture 6.1 Objectives 6.1.1 Preparation 6.2 Background 6.2.1 Addressing Fundamentals 6.2.2 Routing Fundamentals 6.3 Addressing Mechanisms 6.3.1 Classful Addressing 6.3.2 Subnetting 6.3.3 Variable-Length Subnetting 6.3.4 Supernetting 6.3.5 Private Addressing and NAT 6.4 Routing Mechanisms 6.4.1 Establishing Routing Flows 6.4.2 Identifying and Classifying Routing Boundaries 6.4.3 Manipulating Routing Flows 6.5 Addressing Strategies 6.6 Routing Strategies 6.6.1 Evaluating Routing Protocols 6.6.2 Choosing and Applying Routing Protocols 6.7 Architectural Considerations 6.7.1 Internal Relationships 6.7.2 External Relationships 6.8 Conclusions 6.9 Exercises Chapter Seven—Network Management Architecture 7.1 Objectives 7.1.1 Preparation 7.2 Background 7.3 Defining Network Management 7.3.1 Network Devices and Characteristics 7.4 Network Management Mechanisms 7.4.1 Monitoring Mechanisms 7.4.2 Instrumentation Mechanisms 7.4.3 Configuration Mechanisms 7.5 Architectural Considerations 7.5.1 In-Band and Out-of-Band Management 7.5.2 Centralized, Distributed and Hierarchical Management 7.5.3 Scaling Network Management Traffic 7.5.4 Checks and Balances 7.5.5 Managing Network Management Data 7.5.6 MIB Selection 7.5.7 Integration into OSS 7.5.8 Internal Relationships 7.5.9 External Relationships 7.6 Conclusions 7.7 Exercises Chapter Eight—Performance Architecture 8.1 Objectives 8.1.1 Preparation 8.2 Background 8.3 Developing Goals for Performance 8.4 Performance Mechanisms 8.4.1 Quality of Service 8.4.2 Prioritization, Traffic Management, Scheduling, and Queuing 8.4.3 Service-Level Agreements 8.4.4 Policies 8.5 Architectural Considerations 8.5.1 Evaluation of Performance Mechanisms 8.5.2 Internal Relationships 8.5.3 External Relationships 8.6 Conclusions 8.7 Exercises Chapter Nine—Security and Privacy Architecture 9.1 Objectives 9.1.1 Preparation 9.2 Background 9.3 Developing a Security and Privacy Plan 9.4 Security and Privacy Administration 9.4.1 Threat Analysis 9.4.2 Policies and Procedures 9.5 Security and Privacy Mechanisms 9.5.1 Physical Security and Awareness 9.5.2 Protocol and Application Security 9.5.3 Encryption/Decryption 9.5.4 Network Perimeter Security 9.5.5 Remote Access Security 9.6 Architectural Considerations 9.6.1 Evaluation of Security Mechanisms 9.6.2 Internal Relationships 9.6.3 External Relationships 9.7 Conclusions 9.8 Exercises Chapter Ten—Selecting Technologies for the Network Design 10.1 Objectives 10.1.1 Preparation 10.2 Background 10.3 Developing Goals for the Network Design 10.4 Developing Criteria for Technology Evaluation 10.4.1 Broadcast and Non-Broadcast Multiple Access Methods 10.4.2 Technology Functions and Features 10.4.3 Performance Upgrade Paths 10.4.4 Flow Considerations 10.5 Guidelines and Constraints on Technology Evaluations 10.5.1 Constraints on Candidate Technologies 10.6 Making Technology Choices for the Network Design 10.6.1 Segmenting the Network 10.6.2 Isolating Areas - The Black Box Method 10.6.3 Applying Evaluation Criteria and Guidelines 10.7 Conclusions 10.8 Exercises Chapter Eleven—Interconnecting Technologies Within the Network Design 11.1 Objectives 11.1.1 Preparation 11.2 Background 11.3 Shared Medium (No Interconnection) 11.4 Switching 11.4.1 ATM Switching 11.5 Routing 11.6 Hybrid Mechanisms 11.6.1 NHRP 11.6.2 MPOA 11.6.3 Service Switching 11.7 Applying Interconnection Mechanisms to the Design 11.7.1 Hierarchy 11.7.2 Redundancy 11.8 Where to go from Here 11.9 Conclusions 11.10 Exercises Glossary Index